Mother Nature has endowed Iceland with some of the most majestic landscapes, colorful skies and unique geological regions in the world. The country’s scenic beauty and the outdoor activities organized around this beauty are what first attract most visitors to Iceland.

No trip to Iceland is complete without a tour of the famous waterfalls the country has to offer. Visitors might take a few busy, travel-filled days to waterfall-hop from Gullfoss (Iceland’s most famed waterfall) to Dettifoss (Europe’s most powerful waterfall) to Skógafoss (a classic waterfall that is a favorite amongst many tourists) to Dynjandi (known for its unique trapezoidal shape), and so forth. Iceland has at least 20 noted waterfalls, so trigger-happy visitors with cameras can spend days taking snaps of these breathtaking sites.

Beyond waterfalls, Icleand also has many other famous outdoor attractions such as the famous Thingvellir National Park, the Great Geysir, the Blue Lagoon, the volcanic Mount Hekla, or the Kverkfjöll Ice Caves. As all these worthwhile sites are dispersed throughout the country, visitors may wish to book official tours through Icleandic Tours, Touris, or Reykjavík Excursions. Those wishing to explore more freely can look into flights via the nation’s most reliable domestic carrier, Air Iceland, or schedule a bus tour through BSI (the country’s nationwide bus network), or rent a car from a variety of major car rental companies located at the airports.

Travelers who wish to make their excursion a specifically-outdoor-bound one might try contacting Arctic Adventures, an eco-adventure company that specializes in outdoor adventure tours that include rafting, glacial hiking, caving, ice climbing, kayaking, canoeing, and snorkeling.

So, yes, Icleand has seemingly endless opportunities for outdoor activities; but let’s not forget that it is also country that gave us Björk and some of the most eclectic electronica modern music lovers have heard in the past decade or so. As one might expect, then, the country’s capital city, Reykjavík, has amongst its many urban offerings, a dynamic music scene with varying genres from underground electronica to hardcore punk rock to indie to hip-hop to even classical chamber music.

Though Reykjavik, with its population of 170,000, may be small in comparison to other world metropolises, it presents a more than satisfying allure to visitors who may tire of exploring nature. Its opera house, symphony, museums, and plethora of cafes make it the nation’s cultural hub. The Reykjavik night life is also thumping: visitors can have dinner at the famous landmarks The Pearl, or the Icelandic Bar; go clubbing at Pravda, Restaurant 22, or NASA; and even experience some celebrity sightings at Kaffibarinn or Rex Bar.

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